Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.

Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.

Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.

AoiroStudioMay 15, 2019

Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.

We are featuring the bubble tea glass cup design by Mickey Wu, Fang Shih and cie. For those who don’t know what Bubble Tea is, well it’s a street drink culture with tapioca balls invented in Tainan and Taichung in the 1980s. And now it’s a drink being made all over the World and everyone would have their own twist on the recipe. The designers have designed their own eco-friendly concept to waste awareness on waste and also redesigned the entire longevity of the drink. Another factor that makes this concept working even better, no straw needed. Another eco-friendly choice to make it even more unique, would you like to change your way to enjoy your next Bubble Tea?

FLOAT is made of environmentally-friendly recycled glass provided by Spring Pool Glass, which reduces the environmental pollution.

More Links

Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.Reinventing the Bubble Tea Glass Cup, no straw needed.

Video: FLOAT : Non-Straw Glass Cup For Bubble Tea

Credits

  • Designer: 吳 天瑜 Mikey Wu / 史 芳 Fang Shih
  • Adviser: 吳 孝儒 Pili Wu
  • Product Cooperation: 春池玻璃實業有限公司 Spring Pool Glass
  • Photography: Oni Lai Studio
  • Video Assistants: 鄭 中安 Annie Chang / 周 擎 Ching Chou / 賀 律銘 Luming Ho

Performance Planner now live in Google Ads: Shows predicted impact of campaign changes on conversions, clicks, more

Google Ads performance planner is available under the Tools menu.

A new Performance Planner is available in Google Ads. The tool is designed to help advertisers understand how to allocate a set monthly budget across all of their campaigns based on Google’s projections for maximizing incremental conversions — or other advertising goal. It can also be used to understand how changes could potentially impact conversions, clicks and other performance metrics.

It was among the new products highlighted at Google Marketing Live on Tuesday.

How to use it. Advertisers can also play with other inputs, such as CPA and spend and new keywords to see Google’s projected impact on results. When we first covered this in March, it was called Budget Planner, so it’s got a new name now that it’s officially announced, but the functionality is pretty much the same.

You can create a budget plan with either clicks or conversions as the key metric. There is also the option to choose a target: clicks, spend or average CPC if you select clicks as the primary metric, or conversions, spend or average CPA when conversions is your key metric.

On the Compare tab, you can see how your current settings and your planned settings are predicted to stack up against past performance. You can change the time range of the past performance period.

This is strictly a planning tool. Unlike Keyword Planner, for example, you can’t implement changes from the Performance Planner. Instead, you’ll need to download the changes and upload the file into Google Ads Editor.

Requirements for campaigns to be eligible. Campaigns must meet the following criteria to be eligible for forecasting. The tool will notify you when campaigns are not eligible.

  • Have been running for at least 72 hours
  • Have received at least 3 clicks in the last 7 days
  • Have received at least one conversion in the last 7 days (if the campaigns focus on conversions)
  • Are Search campaigns that use a manual cost-per-click (CPC), enhanced CPC, target cost-per-action (CPA), maximize clicks, or maximize conversions bidding strategy.

How forecasts are calculated. Google uses both campaign history and auction data to in its forecasting. Additionally:

  • Forecasts are directional and are updated every 24-48 hours.
  • It takes holidays and other seasonal traffic into account depending on business type and location.
  • Forecasts are more accurate the closer they’re generated to the start date
  • Google notes on the help page that if your campaigns don’t have enough conversion data to create a forecast, but have enough clicks, you can manually enter a conversion rate to see conversion forecasts.

Why we should care. As we wrote in March, this tool won’t tell you how much budget you should start off with, but it can provide some directional (key word here) insights into how changes in spend could impact performance of campaigns that already have enough historical data.

The post Performance Planner now live in Google Ads: Shows predicted impact of campaign changes on conversions, clicks, more appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Google Ads store visits, store sales reporting data partially corrected

Another update in the Google Ads reporting bug saga that started on May 2. There’s progress on the store visits and store sales data inaccuracies.

The latest update. Store sales and store visits data has been fixed for April 28 and 29, as well as May 3 onward. “We are actively working on correcting the data for April 30, May 1 and May 2 (all dates in PDT),” Google said in an update to its blog post on the bug Friday.

Recap on what data is still incorrect. Based on Friday’s update, here’s what is still inaccurate:

  • Store visits and store sales: April 30, May 1, May 2
  • All other reporting: 12:01 a.m. on May 1 to 4 a.m. May 2 (PDT)

Why we should care. If you’re counting on complete data and report on store visits or store sales, you’ll want to keep holding off on April reporting. All other advertisers will not have accurate weekly reporting for last week.

We don’t recall a reporting glitch in Google Ads going unresolved for such a long period of time. Advertisers weren’t alerted to the store conversion data problems until six days after the bug was initially reported. As a reminder, this bug only affects reporting, not any automated bidding models.

The post Google Ads store visits, store sales reporting data partially corrected appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Osore Shanghai Sneak Peek and Unsplash – Cyberpunk Lightroom Presets

Osore Shanghai Sneak Peek and Unsplash – Cyberpunk Lightroom Presets

Osore Shanghai Sneak Peek and Unsplash - Cyberpunk Lightroom Presets

AoiroStudioMay 10, 2019

François here from ABDZ, I wanted to share an update on my Osore Lightroom Presets. As you may have heard or seen, I was in Shanghai a little while ago for the Auto Show. I wrote a couple of really cool articles including a recap, you can check it out here. Being yonder and you guys know about my addictive obsession with neons. It was pretty obvious that I would wander the streets of Shanghai hunting for these illuminated enjoyments and I did! I must admit, the streets of Shanghai felt very different from Tokyo for example but I absolutely love somehow observing the mixture of old and new. It was quite pleasing especially being in a certain neighborhood and seeing the futuristic skyscrapers from far away.

I am finishing up my next Lightroom series for Osore Shanghai and I wanted to share a sneak peek. For the occasion, I shared two pictures free to download via my Unsplash account. As you may have noticed, one picture was used for my #ABDZinShanghai Recap. Last but not least, I am sharing a discount code! Use “letgo” at checkout and get 25% of everything in the store, please enjoy!

Links

Osore Shanghai Sneak Peek and Unsplash - Cyberpunk Lightroom PresetsOsore Shanghai Sneak Peek and Unsplash - Cyberpunk Lightroom PresetsOsore Shanghai Sneak Peek and Unsplash - Cyberpunk Lightroom PresetsOsore Shanghai Sneak Peek and Unsplash - Cyberpunk Lightroom PresetsOsore Shanghai Sneak Peek and Unsplash - Cyberpunk Lightroom Presets

Free via Unsplash

Osore Shanghai Sneak Peek and Unsplash - Cyberpunk Lightroom Presets

Free via Unsplash

Osore Shanghai Sneak Peek and Unsplash - Cyberpunk Lightroom Presets

Limited Code

Use “letgo” at checkout and get 25% of everything in the store, enjoy!

Links

Identity Resolution: Secrets to Success

Live Webinar!Today’s consumers operate in real time. With hundreds of options available and purchases being made in seconds, the need to be in front of these consumers at the moment of decision is more critical than ever. You need to know who your consumers are at the moment of both inbound and outbound engagement to provide in-the-moment, personalized experiences.

Join our panel of experts from Infutor Data Solutions and Signal for a fireside discussion on how top brands are resolving identity and personalizing engagements during the key moments in the customer journey.

Register today for “Identity Resolution: Secrets to Success,” produced by Digital Marketing Depot and sponsored by Infutor..

The post Identity Resolution: Secrets to Success appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Line Icons of the World’s Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World’s Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

abduzeedoMay 03, 2019

Makers Company is a design studio from South Africa that created this awesome set of 12 line icons for some of the world’s most famous landmarks. Each icon is very simple but right on point, it’s beauty within the lines. Check it out!

For more from Makers Company visit themakers.company.

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

We love traveling and created this collection featuring twelve of the world’s most famous landmarks, simplified to showcase each of these wonders unique character.

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

Line Icons of the World's Most Famous Landmarks

John Wick 3 Awesome Poster Design

John Wick 3 Awesome Poster Design

John Wick 3 Awesome Poster Design

abduzeedoMay 01, 2019

Billelis 💀 shared an incredible artwork and poster design project on Behance. They were approached by Lionsgate, LA Associates and the creative team of John Wick 3 to create official key artwork for the launch of the latest Blockbuster installment in the John Wick Franchise- John Wick 3 Parabellum. John Wick has become the target for the world’s top assassins.

After being declared as excommunicado the chances of survival have never been thinner for Wick. This inspired the key artwork. The artwork features Keanu Reeves surrounded by decorative elements inspired by the architectural ornamental details of the Continental Hotel; metallic roses, weapons, angels of death and his beloved late puppy.

The purpose of this campaign was to showcase the artwork across a number of different marketing deliverables including posters, billboards, murals, social media posts and promotional content for cinema.

Credits

Client: Lionsgate, John Wick 3, LA Associates

Rep: Nerd Productions

Artowrk & Poster Design

Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt to leave Alphabet board of directors

Google parent Alphabet today announced that Eric Schmidt would be leaving the board of directors after 18 years. The company said he would not seek reelection after his current term expires in June. He joined the board in 2001, shortly before becoming the company’s CEO.

Ten years at the controls. Schmidt served as Google CEO for a decade, from 2001 until 2011, when co-founder Larry Page reclaimed that position. After that, Schmidt was Executive Chairman until early 2018. Since then he has served and will continue to serve “as a technical advisor” to Google and Alphabet.

In 2015, Google became a business unit of Alphabet, Inc. and co-founders Page and Brin became CEO and President of the new company. They then turned over daily operational control of Google to Sundar Pichai, who became CEO and who later joined the Alphabet board of directors in 2017.

Adult supervision. Eric Schmidt joined Google to provide “adult supervision” to young co-founders Page and Brin. He presided over hyper-growth and Google’s IPO and amassed a significant personal fortune in the process. Forbes estimates his net worth to be nearly $14 billion.

Schmidt helped guide Google through its early days as a small tech startup to become one of the world’s dominant companies and brands. He was a thoughtful and careful chief executive, but at times he made awkward comments, some of which survive in the culture to this day. Most infamous among them was “The Creepy Line” (clip below).

Presided over billions of user products. Most of the iconic acquisitions and product launches that have contributed to Google’s staggering success were made during Schmidt’s tenure as CEO. Among them Android, YouTube, Gmail, Google Maps and AdSense.

The post Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt to leave Alphabet board of directors appeared first on Search Engine Land.

The SEO Advantages of Machine-Readable HTML5 Semantic Markup

Semantic HTML5 provides us with an opportunity to improve our websites and optimize for search engines. We can take full advantage of these opportunities by using machine-readable semantic HTML5 elements to describe page outlines. Specially-named containers can help search engines and browsers more easily identify how our pages are arranged.

For example, <header> is its own element now, as is <nav>, and so on. You have the ability to describe your page outline using these terms. By the way, it’s important not confuse <header> with heading containers (<h1>). These also have semantic rules we should follow; specifically about their relative level, as you’ll see below.

Here’s a look at the SEO opportunities with HTML5 elements and how and why to use them.

Genuine Articles

Perhaps the most important semantic HTML5 element is <article>. This can be used in such a way that your ideal content gets parsed into screen readers and reader views, and search engines will find a hard-coded signal for unique content on the page. You can test to see how this works with a page loaded in your browser by toggling the reader view.

If you don’t see your toggle switch or there is no <article> container in page code, you don’t get the option at all or it won’t load anything separately. If you get content in the reader view, it will be that content which the webmaster wrapped in a single <article> container. As developers we get to style these containers with direct specificity.

Multiple Articles

Although it’s not syntactically incorrect to have more than one <article> element per page, it’s still not a good idea. You don’t get reader view options this way, and there are no search engine benefits either. For blog homepages that list posts, you may think of each blog post as an “article,” except that an excerpt of an article is not the real thing.

Instead, try using the semantically correct <section> element for each post summary where related details are gathered. <section> can correctly nest as a child of <article> in this case. The parent-child relationship between <article> and <section> can be reversed, but we wouldn’t recommend it unless circumstances make that logical.

Let a single <article> wrap a page’s unique content:

<body itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/WebSite"> <a class="visually-hidden focusable" href="#main">Skip Navigation</a> <header id="top" class="margin-bottom-small"> <nav class="container container-small"> <div class="row"> <div class="grid-full"> ... </div> </div> </nav> </header> <main id="main" tabindex="-1" class="content"> <article class="container container-small"> <header> <h1>SEO for Developers by Detlef Johnson</h1> </header> <section class="row"> <div class="grid-half"> <h2>Semantic HTML5</h2> <p>We're doing HTML5 semantic elements ... 

Technical Debt

Technical debt is aging code in the codebase that looks to be no fun to replace or refactor away. The most common technical debt takes the form of un-insightful variable names and database column names.

SEO practitioners often dispense advice reactive to their own painful embedded technical debt. Implementing semantic HTML5 may be a bit like that.

If you’re using a modern framework with a templating language like JSX, and everything is a <div> or a <span>, renaming for successfully implementing <main>, <article>, <header>, <nav>, <footer>, <aside>, <section>, can seem daunting, depending how early in the process you are. The longer you wait the more that technical debt compounds.

Semantic Details

Many of us prefer skipping what we initially think are smaller details for a process of writing code that is going to work, especially when under deadlines. We use what operations we have in place to publish websites and apps with minimal effort in order to be productive. We use frameworks, task runners, and tooling to great effectiveness. We’re constantly eyeing shiny new things to learn.

We also know that unaddressed details can immensely compound technical debt down the road. In the long run, you don’t want all your elements named after the same <div> and <span> elements. Your code will become less and less recognizable over time. Organize your code into logical elements. Use the elements HTML5 provides out of the box.

Semantic SEO Outline

In SEO we’ve long known about headings, particularly the top-level <h1> heading. What makes them special is the meaning they convey about document and section outlines. Start your document outline with elements <main>, <header>, and perhaps one or two <nav> containers (one per link grouping). Then you’ll likely want to use <article> to wrap unique content with <header>, headings, and perhaps its own <footer>.

 <article class="container container-small"> <header> <h1>SEO for Developers by Detlef Johnson</h1> </header> <section class="row"> <div class="grid-half"> <h2>Semantic HTML5</h2> <p>We're doing HTML5 semantic elements ... <h3>Articles and Sections</h3> <p>Article and Section elements should have at least one heading ... <h3>Headings</h3> <p>Headings provide 6 levels for organizing content ... 

Each <section> ought to have at least one heading; probably more. Your headings will outline what makes the best sense in descending order of levels from <h1> through to content with heading <h6>. Think of them as you would bullets and outline levels. It’s rare that you’ll actually use all 6 levels, but they’ll be at your disposal when you want them.

SEO the Semantics

You’ll hear advice from the SEO community that there should always only be one <h1> element per page, all on its own. That’s solid advice. Think of it as the whole page heading. However, it’s definitely not wrong to have more than one — it depends on your document outline. You may elect to bump up the top heading in a <section> or <aside>, or you may show different <h1> content between desktop and mobile.

Use Headings

Each <section> should definitely have a heading, perhaps beginning with level two (<h2>), and descending from there, depending on the content for that section. Use your best judgement and get hints from the W3C validation service. This can warn you when you’re missing <section> headings. Each section can have its own <header> and <footer>, which makes sense when you think about it.

Webmaster Tip: Encode an admin-only set of quick links in a site-wide header or footer, and insert the canonical page spelling for the name value pair so you can click and check page validation more quickly than with other tools like bookmarks.

Taking Aside

As for <aside>, it’s been suggested that these containers are suitable for related content that is not part of the unique content identified by <article>, like an advertising block. These can still be unique to the page, of course. The <aside> will nest nicely in <article> or <section> and can stand on its own, as well. The <aside> container can also have headings <header>, and <footer> — it’s totally up to you.

Footer Wrapper

That should be enough information to get you started. When you’re ready to wrap up your HTML5 semantic markup, you can use the <footer> element for the page footer with its site-wide links in one or more <nav> elements. Most of these Semantic HTML5 elements are treated as block elements by default unless otherwise noted.

Support even the oldest browsers with the following sample polyfill:

<!--[if lt IE 9]> <script> document.createElement("article"); document.createElement("aside"); document.createElement("footer"); document.createElement("header"); document.createElement("nav"); document.createElement("section"); </script> <![endif]--> 

Takeaway: Be Descriptive

The most important thing to look for when you’re otherwise using a semantically sensible <div> to wrap a chunk of content as a grouping for one of the above, is to ask yourself the question: Can I use a more descriptive element? Will it work with my application code? Can I, for example, style it using row class names or other grid logic? Your answer should be yes until you’ve taken full advantage of HTML5 semantic markup.

The post The SEO Advantages of Machine-Readable HTML5 Semantic Markup appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Automotive Design: Tesla Pickup Concept

Automotive Design: Tesla Pickup Concept

Automotive Design: Tesla Pickup Concept

AoiroStudioApr 26, 2019

I have found this automotive design concept of what could look like the next Tesla pickup? The beloved Elon Musk did mention that there will be a Tesla Pickup Truck coming in their lineup and as I quote: “a really futuristic-like cyberpunk Blade Runner design”. How cool is that? One car designer decided to give it his own take on this concept, let’s take a look at the work from Emre Husmen who is a car designer based in Istanbul, Turkey. I just love this concept and know that Fabio might like it as well, him being a fan of pickup trucks. You certainly recognize the iconic front head car design from Tesla current car lineup, how about you? Do you like it? Does it stand true to Tesla?

Links

Automotive Design: Tesla Pickup ConceptAutomotive Design: Tesla Pickup ConceptAutomotive Design: Tesla Pickup ConceptAutomotive Design: Tesla Pickup ConceptAutomotive Design: Tesla Pickup ConceptAutomotive Design: Tesla Pickup ConceptAutomotive Design: Tesla Pickup ConceptAutomotive Design: Tesla Pickup ConceptAutomotive Design: Tesla Pickup ConceptAutomotive Design: Tesla Pickup Concept